Increase Selenium Intake to Avoid Flu!

Lipinski 2015, Ebola and Selenium: How not to catch the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

FEBRUARY 24 · PUBLIC   Published on this site 3/9/3030.  All Links here should be opened with “right click, open in new tab.”

The only people that can be infected by the 2019-n Coronavirus have less than 98.7 µg/L of Selenium in plasma or serum. Those who have enough Selenium are immune to this and all other enveloped viruses. Selenium can be obtained from Brazil nuts, Selenium pills or Astragalus tea. Eating food rich in Selenium will also help us.

CONTINUE TO THE END OF THIS PAGE SEE THE ARTICLE LISTING FOODS RICH IN SELENIUM.

This is why only some people get the flu and why others get it infrequently or never at all.

We only found this out in 2015 when Lipinski @ Harvard figured out why some people were immune to Ebola, a fact well documented in medical archives.

Two Brazil nuts a day will do it. An Asia astragalus tea is the primary source of selenium.

2014 NYTimes: Many in West Africa May Be Immune to Ebola Virus http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/06/health/ebola-immunity.html

2000 Gonzales: Ebola and Marburg virus antibody prevalence in selected populations of the Central African Republic https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10717539

2010-Becquart: High Prevalence of Both Humoral and Cellular Immunity to Zaire ebolavirus among Rural Populations in Gabon http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0009126

2010-IRD: A surprisingly high proportion of the Gabonese population could have immunity against Ebola. Antibodies to the virus were found in 15.3% of rural communities http://en.ird.fr/the-media-centre/scientific-newssheets/337-possible-natural-immunity-to-ebola

2016 Richardson: “The phenomenon of previously undetected, minimally symptomatic EBOV infection was evident around the discovery of the virus in 1976.” http://journals.plos.org/plosntds/article?id=10.1371/journal.pntd.0005087

2015 BBC: “We’ve now seen several cases that don’t have any symptoms at all, asymptomatic cases,” https://www.bbc.com/news/health-31019097

“29 Jan 2015 – Liberia: Harvard Scientist Lipinski Claims Selenium Can Treat Ebola” https://allafrica.com/stories/201501291709.html

2015 Lipinski – Can Selenite Be An Ultimate Inhibitor Of Ebola And Other Viral Infections?

“It is known that the virulence of Ebola and other RNA enveloped viruses involves in the first step their attachment to host cell membranes. Following this initial step the virus enters the target cell cytoplasm by forming hydrophobic spikes that make holes in the membrane lipid bilayer. Formation of such spikes is catalyzed by the reduced form of viral protein disulfide isomerase (PDIred) thus initiating chain of disulfide exchange reactions. Consequently, hydrophobic protein epitopes become exposed, which in the absence of proper chaperones form hydrophobic ‘spikes’ capable of penetrating the host cell membranes.

In this communication evidence is discussed showing that the chain of disulfide exchange events can be inhibited by a small redox molecule – sodium selenite.

It is suggested that this inexpensive and readily available food supplement can be an ultimate inhibitor of Ebola and other enveloped viral infections.”

“other enveloped viral infections” – that’s pretty much all of them.

http://www.journalrepository.org/media/journals/BJMMR_12/2014/Dec/Lipinski632014BJMMR14858.pdf

2015 Stoffenell: “98.7 µg/L of Se in plasma or serum are required to optimize GPx activity” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4377864/

2008 Thomson: Brazil nuts: an effective way to improve selenium status http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/87/2/379.full

Dr. Damien Downing, former editor of the Journal of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine, writes: “Swine flu, bird flu, and SARS, all developed in selenium-deficient China. When patients were given selenium, viral mutation rates dropped and immunity improved.”

Map of coronavirus deaths in China:

https://www.extremetech.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/JH-coronavirus.jpg

Maps of selenium deficient soil in China:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3967180/bin/nutrients-06-01103-g001.jpg

 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/320292106/figure/fig8/AS:[email protected]/Water-soluble-selenium-content-in-soil-of-each-city-in-China-ug-kg.png?fbclid=IwAR2R4c17xqWpMeB1S8sss7YfybrBginyb3tzOnBy9E5YmTjGOSzbey9hTBY

https://media.springernature.com/m685/springer-static/image/art%3A10.1038%2Fsrep20953/MediaObjects/41598_2016_Article_BFsrep20953_Fig1_HTML.jpg?fbclid=IwAR11D4Gngcm76IQ447uNZvHFvDgZyrRcMwBjSTwUGu8uAD6o99CH5n3YMmY

https://www.mdpi.com/viruses/viruses-07-00333/article_deploy/html/images/viruses-07-00333-g001-1024.png?fbclid=IwAR0R5wf6KpTHBaOYVbbhiqOFKwB380ZgUXATOnHgzN0y8WEEpXNPx_yYdrY

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/proxy/MKDITWGEvOaey1kJU00I_1NzcQxYD-AtOCcfMZKOLlBIjgcO_g7rYavmNVflg8KJCkDwtLN3H64_n-GUAUe6IhKGAS1DY8wOl00w?fbclid=IwAR2mzPyxpJ7O__jjo_7XPmE-IFZjDtstnZkCefnbcu92iT7VcQ2_iTuo4jA

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michael_Dermience/publication/265619914/figure/fig2/AS:[email protected]/Soil-selenium-deficiency-in-PR-China-Li-et-al-2009.png?fbclid=IwAR3AlBg5j8ORseUSfu2XPHEkZN-zsMx1WzsqIZbe1yCHYEcwgGbLPBMTcT4

The Changing Selenium Nutritional Status of Chinese Residents

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3967180/

 

20 Foods Rich in Selenium

SOURCE: https://www.healthline.com/health/selenium-foods#cashews

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What is selenium?

Your body relies on selenium, an important mineral, for many of its basic functions, from reproduction to fighting infection. The amount of selenium in different foods depends on the amount of selenium in the soil where the food was grown. Rain, evaporation, pesticides, and pH levels can all affect selenium levels in soil. That makes selenium deficiency more common in certain parts of the world, though it’s relatively rare in the United States.

Regardless of where you live, certain factors can make it harder for your body to absorb selenium. For example, you may have difficulty absorbing selenium if you:

In addition, those with Graves’ disease or hypothyroidism need to pay special attention to their selenium intake as it serves a protective role for the thyroid.

How much selenium do I need?

While too little selenium can cause serious health problems, too much selenium can also be toxic. Follow these guidelines from the National Institutes of Health to determine how much selenium is right for you:

Age Recommended daily amount of selenium
Over 14 years 55 mcg
9 to 13 years 40 mcg
4 to 8 years 30 mcg
7 months to 3 years 20 mcg
Birth to 6 months 15 mcg

Women who are pregnant or lactating need up to 60 mcg of selenium per day.

Keep reading to learn which foods provide the most selenium.

  1. Brazil nuts

Brazil nuts are one of the best sources of selenium. One ounce, or about six to eight nuts, contains about 544 mcg. Make sure you only eat a serving of Brazil nuts a few times a week to avoid selenium toxicity.

  1. Fish

Yellowfin tuna contains about 92 mcg of selenium per 3 ounces (oz), making it an excellent source of selenium. This is followed by sardines, oysters, clams, halibut, shrimp, salmon, and crab, which contain amounts between 40 and 65 mcg.

  1. Ham

Many health-conscious eaters avoid ham due to its high salt content. However, it provides about 42 mcg of selenium per 3 oz serving, or 60 percent of the recommended daily intake for adults.

  1. Enriched foods

Some products, including pastas, whole wheat breads, and whole grain cereals, are enriched or fortified with selenium and other minerals. The amount of selenium in these products will vary, but you can typically get up to 40 mcg per 1 cup serving of noodles or cereal, and about 16 mcg from 2 slices of whole grain toast. Just make sure you balance enriched foods with plenty of whole, plant-based foods for optimal nutrition.

  1. Pork

Three ounces of lean pork contain about 33 mcg of selenium.

  1. Beef

The selenium content of beef depends on the cut, but a bottom round beef steak will provide you with about 33 mcg. Beef liver provides about 28 mcg, and ground beef offers about 18 mcg.

  1. Turkey

You can get 31 mcg of selenium from 3 oz of boneless turkey. Eat a turkey sandwich on fortified whole wheat bread for extra selenium.

  1. Chicken

Chicken will give you about 22 to 25 mcg of selenium per 3 oz of white meat. This translates to a serving that’s similar in size to a deck of cards, making it an easy way to add some selenium to your diet.

  1. Cottage cheese

One cup of cottage cheese provides about 20 mcg, or 30 percent of your daily recommended intake of selenium.

  1. Eggs

One hard-boiled egg provides about 20 mcg of selenium. Don’t like hard-boiled? No worries, go for eggs cooked any way you like, and you’ll still get a dose of selenium.

  1. Brown rice

One cup of cooked long-grain brown rice will provide you with 19 mcg of selenium, or 27 percent of the recommended daily amount. Enjoy this grain with your favorite 3 oz portion of chicken or turkey to get up to 50 mcg of selenium — almost the entire recommended daily amount for adults. You can also substitute rice for barley which provides 23mcg per 1/3 cup serving.

  1. Sunflower seeds

A quarter cup of sunflower seeds provides almost 19 mcg of selenium, making them a great snack, especially if you don’t eat animal products, which tend to have higher levels of selenium.

  1. Baked beans

Enjoy a cup of baked beans and you’ll get about 13 mcg of selenium along with some important fiber.

  1. Mushrooms

Mushrooms are fungi that contain many nutrients, including vitamin D, iron, and about 12 mcg of selenium in a 100-gram serving. Try these 16 vegetarian-friendly recipes with mushrooms.

  1. Oatmeal

One cup of regular oatmeal, cooked, will give you 13 mcg of selenium. Enjoy it for breakfast with two eggs to get 53 mcg.

  1. Spinach

Spinach, cooked from frozen, will provide you with about 11 mcg of selenium per cup. It’s also packed full of folic acid and vitamin C.

  1. Milk and yogurt

Milk and yogurt each contain about 8 mcg of selenium per cup, or 11 percent of your needs per day. Add some milk to your enriched cereal to up your intake.

  1. Lentils

One cup of cooked lentils provides about 6 mcg of selenium, plus a healthy dose of protein and fiber. Add them to a soup with mushrooms for a vegan-friendly meal full of selenium.

  1. Cashews

Dry roasted cashews offer 3 mcg per ounce. That may not seem like much, but every bit helps, especially if you follow a vegan diet. Snack on some dry roasted cashews and you’ll get a small amount of selenium, at 3 mcg per one ounce serving.

  1. Bananas

One cup of chopped banana offers 2 mcg of selenium, or 3 percent of your daily recommended intake. Again, this might not seem like much, but most fruits offer only minimal traces of selenium or none at all. Add bananas to a smoothie with yogurt or your favorite oatmeal for more selenium.

 

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